Homosexuals are twice as likely to suffer from this painful disease than heterosexuals

Homosexuals are twice as likely to suffer from this painful disease than heterosexuals

Homosexuals are twice as likely to suffer from this painful disease than heterosexuals

Homosexuals are twice as likely to suffer from this painful disease than heterosexuals

A recent study found that gay men who engage in “high-risk sexual activity” are twice as likely to be diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than heterosexual men who engage in high-risk sexual activity.

This might sound common sense given the sexual interests of homosexuals, but researchers still haven’t definitively found the cause. In the study, “high-risk sexual activity” was defined as sexual contact without a condom, as well as sex with several sexual partners.

They plan to look into the problem more closely to find the culprit.

The study, conducted by Case Western Reserve University and University Hospital Cleveland Medical Center, looked at self-reported data collected between 2002 and 2022 from 58 healthcare organizations across the United States.

Related: Meet the gay doctor who answers the questions you’re too shy to ask your doctor

The researchers found that 0.8 percent of people who self-reported engaging in high-risk same-sex activity had Crohn’s disease (painful inflammation of the digestive tract) and 1.26 percent had ulcerative colitis (painful open sores in the intestines). Comparatively, 0.49 percent of men who self-reported high-risk heterosexual behavior had Crohn’s disease, and 0.52 percent had ulcerative colitis, SciTech Daily reported.

The researchers also found that men with Crohn’s disease who engaged in high-risk same-sex sexual activity were more likely to have other potentially painful perianal diseases that affect the anal tissues, as well as diseases that can dangerously narrow the colon or small intestine.

The research team said it will continue to study the problem more closely using a $1,100,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The donations will enable them to collect more plasma, tissue and stool samples from LGBTQ people for gut microbiome analysis by 2025.

“Studying the causes of IBD in this underrepresented patient population compared to other patient groups will allow us to further investigate the causes of disease development in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and develop personalized precision medicine and treatment strategies while reducing stigma,” he said. Fabio Cominelli, co-author of the study and professor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine.

The study was published in a peer-reviewed medical journal Hose.



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